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Living in a world in the midst of a climate crisis, it would be naïve to think that there is an area of ​​life that he won’t end up touching. Fortunately, there are people working to find solutions. During Jerusalem Design Week 2022, and following the theme “For now”, a group of designers created an outdoor performative laboratory space. Here they debuted Grow a building, an architectural project that proposes to use the soil and local roots as structuring elements. Buildings would sprout, bloom, dry up, produce new materials, and then return to the same ground to start all over again.

Designers Elisheva Gillis, Gitit Linker, Danny Freedman, Noa Zermati, Adi Segal, Rebeca Partook, Or Naim and Nof Nathansohn have explored the possibility of constructing 3D printed buildings using organic materials. A bespoke robotic arm uses a digital workflow to build small structures with a mixture of soil and seeds. When you are done printing the layers on top of each other, the structure sprouts seeds. The exterior is covered with vegetation while the interior fills with dry roots – a new and strong material in itself. The need for alternative resources is only growing, and the process behind To Grow a Building could be one of them.

organic culture compound 3D printed into a shape by a robotic arm

organic culture compound 3D printed into a shape by a robotic arm

The project was supported by Rogovin, a company that promotes ecological innovation in the field of real estate.

organic culture compound 3D printed into a shape by a robotic arm

3D printed organic culture compound

3D printed material

3D printed material

3D printed organic culture compound

3D printed material with small plants starting to grow

3D printed material with small plants starting to grow

3D printed material with small plants starting to grow

3D printed material with small plants starting to grow

3D printed material with small plants starting to grow

3D printed material with small plants starting to grow

3D printed material with small plants starting to grow

3D printed material with small plants starting to grow

3D printed material with small plants starting to grow

organic culture compound 3D printed into a shape by a robotic arm

organic culture compound 3D printed into a shape by a robotic arm

To learn more about To Grow a Building, visit 2022.jdw.co.il.

Photography by Dor Kedmi.

Kelly Beall is an editor at Design Milk. The Pittsburgh-based graphic designer and writer has had a deep love of art and design for as long as she can remember and enjoys sharing her discoveries with others. When she’s not distracted by great art and design, she can be found messing around in the kitchen, consuming as much information as she can, or on the couch with her three pets. Find her @designcrush on social media.