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Dropping a heavy object that breaks a few ceramic floor tiles or uncovering rot in a hardwood floor requires replacing some of the material, but what if the material is no longer manufactured? Building materials, especially those that follow fads and trends, can be hard to find if they’re over a few years old, but don’t give up. Beforehand, learn how to search for abandoned materials, and if you can’t find them, learn how to make repairs that look good.

Expand your search for the material.

Most DIY enthusiasts find that a material is no longer manufactured or stored when they return to the same store where they first purchased it. However, there is always a possibility that the same material will not be completely sold out in other stores. If you discover that the equipment you need has been interrupted and Lowe’s is all exhausted, call Menards and Home depot, as well as local lumberyards, to determine if they still have any in stock. Hopefully you will find some.

Check outlets and customs clearance centers.

Patchwork Renovation

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When companies and manufacturers go bankrupt, outlets and liquidation centers often buy the rest of their wares to sell at a discount to the public. These dealers often carry a wide variety of items, including wallpaper designs, floor tiles, and other abandoned building materials. It won’t hurt to call, and it just might solve the problem. In line, Overstock.com is a good source for checking wood flooring, tiles, and more; Mohawk Factory Store specializes in abandoned flooring. Tile land is a good place to start your search for abandoned tiles.

Search donation sites.

Patchwork Renovation

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If you’ve used the material in your home, there’s a good chance someone else has, too. When contractors and renovators have leftover materials, which is common, they often donate them to local centers for a deduction on their taxes. These centers resell the equipment to the general public at a reduced price. Many donation stores exist; some of the most popular are operated by Habitat for Humanity and are known as Habitat ReStores.

Take a sample to a local retailer.

Patchwork Renovation

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If you’ve exhausted all of your options for finding some of the original material you’re looking for, the best thing to do is match it up as much as possible. To do this, take a sample of the material (or a photo if you can’t access a room) to a local lumberyard or home improvement center. Often, technicians in the relevant department can retrieve similar items on their computers to find a close match, and then order some for you.

Pull matching materials elsewhere in your home.

When you need the exact material to repair a significant area, try sourcing it from another area of ​​your house. If the brick siding on the front of the house has been damaged by a vehicle hitting it, look for matching materials elsewhere on the property. For example, is there a matching brick mailbox in front of the house? If so, consider using the mailbox brick to patch the siding of the house, then install another mailbox.

Create a breakpoint.

Patchwork Renovation

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When you need to use a mismatched material, create an attractive breakpoint. If a water leak has marred the wallpaper on one wall, but you cannot find a matching wallpaper, consider repainting only the damaged wall in a pattern that complements the existing paper, stopping at corners to create a finished look. Another thing you could try is to completely peel the paper off that wall and then paint it. Here ! You now have an accent wall.

Consider replacing all materials.

In some situations, the best option is to replace all the hardware. Imagine missing a few shingles on the roof, and no matter how hard you try to match the abandoned shingles, the new ones stick out like a sore thumb. If incompatible materials are compromising the entire look of the area, it may be time to replace everything in order to achieve the consistent look you are looking for.